Going The Social Distance

Canada has seen a steady incline of positive coronavirus cases. Manitoba is for now on the lower amount of confirmed cases with only 35, whereas Quebec is now over 1300. Provinces and other nations are already in a state of emergency. Most areas are now limiting gathers to 5 or less.  

However, there are some essential things to take into consideration with these numbers. We can only test and confirm as fast as our time and resources allow. Tests are minimal, and the majority of cases will go untested and recover without any medical treatment. This is because it’s being advised that people only test if your symptoms are more critical and require medical attention. With that in consideration, there remain hundreds to thousands of people who will go unconfirmed, and may never exhibit severe symptoms. We must take this into account when asking if the social distancing is necessary.

In the past decade, we have seen a few dangerous viruses and illnesses that affected people on a global scale. Throughout the 2000’s we had seen Mad Cow, the SARS, H1N1, and Ebola. If you go further back, you see epidemics of the Spanish Flu, Small Pox, and Polio. But none of these epidemics had closed down our modern world like the coronavirus. 

Across the world, nations have had to enforce lockdown and other emergency protocols. Las Vegas has wholly closed for only the 2nd time in history, the first being JFK’S assassination. In more extreme cases, the Italian government has issued threats of using physical force and weapons to shut down large gatherings and social events if people continue to not comply with these temporary laws. While some of these measures may seem drastic, many people are still not taking these warnings seriously.

People who are sick, and people who have been returning home from travel have been proactive as a whole at practicing social distancing and self-isolation. These are not the only people who are at risk for infecting the rest of the public, just the most immediate. The more significant risk is a large amount of the population right now that isn’t showing symptoms and are at risk for passing the virus on unknowingly.

The coronavirus can take up to 2 weeks for symptoms to start. In this time, a seemingly healthy individual with no symptoms, but that has unknowingly picked up the virus can and will transmit it. The average person has the potential to infect up to hundreds of people in one day. You don’t have to come into immediate contact or proximity to transmit the virus. Anyone who accepts their money uses a door handle after them or picks up the jar that they put back is at high risk of contracting the virus. This is an example of the average person. Social distancing has been put into effect to try and reduce and eventually eliminate this from happening. 

With hospitality and customer service industries closing, many people have been transitioned to work at home or laid off. 

This proactive measure kept hundreds of thousands of us contracting and dying from the COVID 19. If companies didn’t take these precautions, the numbers would be significantly higher

This is the same outcome that social distancing is to have. There are a lot of people who work in health care, emergency services, network providers, customer service positions, retirement and care home staff, and many other vital professionals will still have to go into work. These people are working hard to keep us safe; our loved ones cared for and keep our resources going. We all must do our part to keep them healthy, too. 

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Together We Can Flatten The Curve & Bounce Back

While this measure is for the best interest of our entire population, it isn’t exactly practical for everyone. Having to follow these social distancing rules and being forced into self-isolation does pose the risk of experiencing cabin fever, a term used to coin the effects that being cooped up for long periods can have on the mind and body.

Some potential risks and symptoms of cabin fever include:

Depression or sadness

Becoming agitated 

Headaches 

Lethargy 

Restlessness 

Troubles concentrating 

Decreased motivation 

Frequent napping

Difficulty waking up

Weight gain or loss

Social isolation 

Here are some things you can do to beat cabin fever and making working and playing at home healthier and happier than ever!

Exercise at home 

Start a DIY project 

Take free online courses 

Virtual Museums 

Try meditation 

Do yoga/stretch 

Read 

Write 

Start a blog 

Set your goals

Work on your business 

Clean your house

At-home spa treatments 

Scrapbook 

Plan a trip

Learn your family tree

Learn a new skill, craft, or language

Try a new show or YouTube channel 

Play board games

Try to make every day different as much as you can, whether you’re with family or alone. 

While we should be staying away from busy public areas, you can still enjoy getting outside. It is vital for your mental health and body to get fresh air and sunshine (natural Vitamin D). If you are someone who has been transitioned to work at home, it is a good idea to take yourself on a walk after a long day of working at home before a long night of binge-watching Netflix. Give your eyes a break and your body and legs much-needed movement and stretching. 

We are all in this together, and together we can bounce back faster than ever. 

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