How To Save A Life

Bystanders using CPR and an AED save up to 30 000 + lives a year. The use of these things together can very often be the difference in life or death of a cardiac event such as sudden cardiac arrest (SCA).

How To Save A Life Using CPR

CPR stands for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and is the procedure of performing chest compressions and rescue breaths. This keeps oxygen pumping to vital organs until EMS arrives. AED is an Automated External Defibrillator, these are portable machines that can measure a person’s heartbeat and detect if it has stopped, and administer a sock in efforts to restart the heart.

The combination of these two things can raise survival rates from 20% to up to 60% or more.

Using CPR To Save A Life

The success of the CPR does vary from each situation and is not guaranteed however many times, CPR alone or CPR with an AED can save the person’s life, and should be attempted if possible.

Performing CPR and using an AED is very easy to do.
There are reports of children successfully saving lives by performing chest compressions (see examples here) with little actual training.

AEDs are very user-friendly. They come with easy to follow directions, units such as the Zoll AEDs we distribute provide CPR assistance with a built-in technology that can sense the depth and rate of your compressions and has audio prompts and an easy to read screen that can provide feedback and advice such as push harder, on the CPR.

CPR infographic, how to do cpr
How To Perform CPR. Share to help save.

How Do You Perform CPR?

Before starting First Aid & CPR, assess that the scene is safe enough for you to do so without putting yourself or the patient in additional risk.

911 – AED – CPR

It is essential for 911 to be called immediately.
If possible assign someone to call 911 and retrieve the AED as soon as possible.

If you are alone, call 911 first, get the AED and then begin rescue efforts.
The 911 operator will help you with CPR until EMS arrives.

Tap them on the shoulder and ask “Are You Ok?”

  1. Open Airway. It is ideal for the patient to be lying on their back. Tilt their head slightly to lift the chin.
  2. Check For Breathing. Listen (for no longer than 10 seconds) for breathing. If the person is not breathing, begin CPR.

If you’re not trained in CPR it is advised to not do the breaths if you’re not already familiar with how to give them. If you are CPR certified or confident in your ability to; then proceed with rescue breaths.

See how to perform rescue breaths below.

Steps Of CPR

Basic CPR Steps
  1. Position. Interlock fingers, Center Of Patients Chest.
    Interlock your fingers and place the heel of your hand on the center of their chest, interlock your fingers by placing the heel of your other hand, on top of the other hand. Keep your arms straight, keep your fingers raised so they do not touch the patient. 
  2. Give Compressions.

Compressions should be done with force and speed. Compressions should be 2” deep and done at a pace of 100 compressions a minute. If you are giving rescue breaths, do 30 compressions, and then deliver 2 rescue breaths.

How To Give Rescue Breaths

CPR rescue breathing how to do rescue breathing
Performing Rescue Breaths. Share and help save.

If you are not familiar already or haven’t been properly trained, it is advised to continue with CPR. If performing breaths follow these instructions.

  1. Open Airways
    Make sure the head is tilted and chin lifted slightly. 
  2. Pinch the nostrils closed with one hand, and support the chin with the other.
  3. Take a normal breath and place your mouth over theirs, making sure it is sealed so no air gets out. 
  4. Blow into the person’s mouth to make the chest rise, watch it fall. Deliver 2 rescue breaths and then continue with compressions. 

Continue CPR until emergency officials arrive, or if the patient starts breathing.

How To Use An AED

If an AED is available, use it before performing CPR.
Many AED units have technology that assists the person with CPR.

How to use an aed aed infographic aed steps
How To Use An AED
  1. Turn On AED. Follow the included instructions.
  2. Place Pads On the Chest & Push Analyze
  3. Administer Shock (If Advised)*
  4. Begin CPR.

Place the pads according to the AEDs instructions on the chest.
Push the analyze button and let AED read the patient’s heartbeat.
If no heartbeat is detected, the AED will inform you to administer a shock. 
If the AED prompts you to, push the shock button.

If no shock is required, the AED will inform you. Begin CPR after use.

Always make sure that you can do this without putting yourself or the patient in further danger. Ensure that the scene is safe from any hazards and that performing CPR won’t further injure the individual. Always call 9-1-1 first (or assign someone to) the operator will assist you in CPR until officials arrive. You do not need to be officially certified to perform CPR on someone, you just need to understand what you are doing, and be able to do it confidently. 


Everyday Heroes: The Office Saves a Life

In this segment of Everyday Heroes, a brave individual saves a woman in a moving vehicle using CPR that he learned on The Office.

Not All Heroes Wear Capes

In Everyday Heroes, Operation Heart Heal outlines stories of everyday people saving other everyday people. The amount of lives saved by bystanders using First Aid measures such as CPR and AED use has increased significantly over the years. 

Using CPR in a life or death situation can be intimidating, and many people do not feel comfortable unless they have official CPR training. While proper training is recommended, it is not necessary to be able to successfully save a life using CPR. CPR is easy to use, and with this trick highlighted in The Office, easy to remember. 

Belive some things you see on TV

One Woman has The Office to thank for being alive today. In today’s Everyday Heroes, an Arizona man uses the CPR technique he had recently seen demonstrated on the popular comedy, The Office.

In the original article you can find here, the man explains how he had no prior knowledge of CPR before, nor had he ever planned on performing it in the first place. But the thing about CPR is you never know when you’ll need it, and for who. 

In the scene, the staff of the company in the show get CPR training. To help them remember the compression rates of 100 compressions a minute, she tells them to do the compressions to the beat of Stayin’ Alive, an actual trick that is taught by many CPR instructors. You can see it below.

Rescued From A Moving Vehicle

The man has noticed the woman unconscious at the wheel of her car, driving down a dirt road. He had to break a window with a rock to get to the woman, he then began performing CPR, his only point of reference is the scene in the office. With no cell phone or other bystanders around, this seemed like the best move, and it was. He had successfully saved the woman’s life and she shortly regained consciousness.

Using CPR To Save Lives

The most important part of CPR training is the technique and rate of compressions. There are many great sources of information on how to properly perform CPR, and as long as you are confident enough to be able to properly administer chest compressions, then you do not need a proper certification if you find yourself in a situation where you need to perform CPR. It is recommended to get official training as there is much more to basic First Aid and CPR that you really only learn from a proper instructor, things like rescue breathing, AED use and other techniques that can help if the situation doesn’t call for CPR. 

If you are interested in learning how to perform CPR yourself, you can check out our information on performing CPR and using a defibrillator. 

The Office Helps Save A Life

Everyday Heroes, People Saving Other People.

More often than not, a medical emergency doesn’t happen in the convenience of a home or a hospital. In the news and social media, we see examples of strangers saving other people’s lives. Because the reality is, many times it is a bystander who takes action. People save other people’s lives, all of the time.

A teenager in Surrey had experienced an unexplained event of Cardiac Arrest. It was the use of an AED and CPR that saved the boy’s life, you can read the full story here. A similar situation where in the middle of giving a speech at a banquet, a man fell into Cardiac Arrest and went unconscious. Two women who where CPR trained were able to save the man’s life with prompt CPR and AED use. You can enjoy the full story of that, here.

This is why it is important for organizations, even schools, and families to take action on educating themselves and others in proper first aid CPR and other emergency procedures, as well as having onsite AED units.

Emergencies such as Sudden Cardiac Arrest can happen to anyone, any age, at any time. In Canada alone, on average someone goes into Sudden Cardiac Arrest every 12 minutes. 

Many businesses and organizations require only the manager to have First Aid/CPR training if any. The problem with that is there have been, and will be cases where it is the manager who is in need of assistance. By taking measures to have staff First Aid CPR trained organizations can better prepare for both an internal medical emergency, and gives them the ability to help in an emergency outside of the workplace. 

Similarly, schools should begin taking the initiative to provide First Aid and CPR education as part of their programs. Students can grasp, learn and use First Aid and CPR from a young age, but there are little measures taken to properly teach them. Take a look at the story of this Saskatoon Grandmother who was saved by her own grandchildren, whose mother taught them CPR over the summer.
Watch the short video here.

You never know who will end up using it, and the reverse of that is true. In many circumstances, not everyone is educated or comfortable enough to be able to take the action necessary in an emergency. Having proper First Aid and CPR training gives people the skills and confidence they need to be able to make a difference.