The Shocking Reality of Emergency Medical Services

Manitoba is home to just over a Million people (total), but with only 10 official cities, this leaves a large amount of the population living in smaller rural communities, towns, and reservations. Manitoba has many populated areas that are without any nearby hospital or other emergency medical services. In many of these cases, there is little to no dedicated emergency medical services. In areas where there is no round-the-clock emergency medical care, it is often left up to the local officials or fire and law enforcement departments. The reality is, that isn’t practical.

Anywhere that you have a community, there needs to be emergency medical resources.

Winnipeg in recent years has seen a trend of emergency room & other similar service closures in Winnipeg and surrounding areas. Winnipeg has started closing emergency rooms or converting to urgent care only, leaving Winnipeg technically, with only 3 official emergency rooms.

While these changes are said to benefit a bigger picture such as the city and health care, staff, quality of care, all of those kinds of things, it does still have an impact on overall emergency care, especially since this seems to be the transition phase from what our previous EMS structure was, to what it will be. This still leaves many areas within Winnipeg alone without an Emergency Room, meaning the average amount of time it takes to get to get to the nearest ER goes up, as does wait times and, in turn, affecting the over all quality of care.

This is why Operation Heart Heal has decided to take matters into their own hands with their AED donation program. By placing a huge emphasis First Aid Training and AED donation in rural and First Nations communities that don’t have access to hospitals or other regulated emergencies medical care. 

Operation Heart Heal hopes to help by providing these rural areas with sufficient First Aid & CPR Training, as well as matching full classes with the donation of an AED (automated external defibrillator) unit.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest affects 1 Canadian every 12 minutes, and that could be anyone.

Rural areas such as smaller communities, reserves, and towns make up a large portion of our population but are often over saught because individually, they are small in size. The majority of Cardiac arrests happen at home or other public spaces, and the survival rate of Cardiac Arrest episodes without an AED is significantly lower compared to those where an AED is able to be used. 

The bottom line is, if there is a population there, there needs to be care.

By getting AED units located in these areas, members of the community can better assist each other in emergencies. Having an AED around during Cardiac Arrest can literally be the difference between life and death in many scenarios. AED’s are very user-friendly, usually provide instance or instruction on use and CPR and only shocks if it is detected as necessary, with these facts in mind, we should be taking extra effort to have more units throughout public areas. Ideally, communities and cities should be planning the proper placement of publically accessible AED units in their areas and making them public knowledge. While many buildings such as large employment offices, malls, and other public areas do take measures to make sure there is one on their properties, it is not common practice by municipality officials to be making this a priority, in most areas. 

For more information on AED’s including how to use them and perform CPR, be sure to stop by our blog. Feel free to share this information with as many people as you’d like, and don’t forget to follow or subscribe for updates on our blog, including Operation Heart Heal’s mission progress. 

If you know of an organization that could use first aid training, an AED or other questions, including how to get First Aid CPR & AED Certified yourself, get in touch with us today!

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